Hi. My name is Lauren, I'm 19 years old. I live my life from a suitcase, and hope to never stop traveling.

31st July 2014

Photo reblogged from Remember: You Are Not Alone with 94,400 notes

just-a-skinny-boy:

happinessis—withinreach:

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]


this is so important please remember this its very accurate and these things are extremely helpful when someone is panicking

just-a-skinny-boy:

happinessis—withinreach:

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

this is so important please remember this its very accurate and these things are extremely helpful when someone is panicking

Source: perspicious

31st July 2014

Photo reblogged from You Fool with 114,354 notes

Source: veryraresecrete

31st July 2014

Post reblogged from Speak If You Gotta with 700,444 notes

amoying:

im always suspicious of anyone that finds me attractive

Source: amoying

31st July 2014

Post reblogged from Life's A Gamble with 392,547 notes

methvevo:

should i message them again or am i just being really clingy and annoying: a life story by me

30th July 2014

Post reblogged from Cobra Bubbles? Aliens are attacking my house. with 439,301 notes

cocoastripper:

queer-punk:

WE NEED FEMINISM BECAUSE WHEN LANCE ARMSTRONG GOT CANCER AND LOST A TESTICLE IT WAS ALL ABOUT HIS HEALTH AND HOW INSPIRATIONAL HE WAS BUT WHEN ANGELINA JOLIE GETS A DOUBLE MASTECTOMY TO PREVENT HERSELF FROM GETTING CANCER, IT’S ALL ABOUT HOW SHE WON’T BE A SEX SYMBOL ANYMORE AND HOW MEN ARE OFFENDED CAUSE SHE WON’T BE AN OBJECT FOR THEM 

Source: queer-punk

30th July 2014

Post reblogged from youre my goosepickle. with 585,213 notes

neoputa:

i have unlimited texting and i only text 3 people ever i think my phone company looks at my bill and just laughs

30th July 2014

Photo reblogged from awkward and nervous with 60,926 notes

Source: pokec0re

30th July 2014

Post reblogged from shades of wrong with 12,275 notes

rosietheriveter:

remember: if you want to be taken seriously as a female sports fan you must have watched the sport for a minimum of 27 years, be able to recall the entire roster from last year and 1983, never insinuate that a player is the least bit attractive, and memorize the rule book backwards in Cantonese

Source: rosietheriveter

30th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Living in my mind with 13,770 notes

Source: ellieeeeeeeee

28th July 2014

Photo

This is what we saw yesterday as we were leaving… After four hours in the Burlington airport and 24 hours in the Philly airport, our plane is here, and the flight is on the board so I’m thinking this is a go! Hopefully I will see you on the flip side… Philadelphia, I hope not to return to your airport for a very very long time.

This is what we saw yesterday as we were leaving… After four hours in the Burlington airport and 24 hours in the Philly airport, our plane is here, and the flight is on the board so I’m thinking this is a go! Hopefully I will see you on the flip side… Philadelphia, I hope not to return to your airport for a very very long time.

28th July 2014

Photo reblogged from PUNK MONSIEUR with 155 notes

punkmonsieur:

Go to www.punkmonsieur.com and subscribe to get the latest sales ad new arrivals

punkmonsieur:

Go to www.punkmonsieur.com and subscribe to get the latest sales ad new arrivals

28th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Vodkacupcakes with 61,116 notes

purifiant:

jakfruit:

My friends all lined up on the roof, just minutes before Seattle’s annual firework show.

yesss my city

purifiant:

jakfruit:

My friends all lined up on the roof, just minutes before Seattle’s annual firework show.

yesss my city

Source: jakfruit

28th July 2014

Photo reblogged from j e y with 27,317 notes

Source: swagpizza

28th July 2014

Post reblogged from Off To The Races with 87,144 notes

deathbedscene:

having siblings is weird bc like one minute u want to strangle them with their own intestines and then later ur singing dramatic duets together

Source: deathbedscene

28th July 2014

Photo reblogged from 365 Days of Summer with 4,422 notes

karlmannlegur:

#1 Luxury Blog in Sweden

karlmannlegur:

#1 Luxury Blog in Sweden

Source: atlasofvanity